Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Polylog: Forum for Intercultural Philosophy

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Polylog: Forum for Intercultural Philosophy

Abstract:
We understand intercultural philosophy as the endeavor to give expression to the many voices of philosophy in their respective cultural contexts and thereby to generate a shared, fruitful discussion granting equal rights to all. In intercultural philosophy we see above all a new orientation and new practice of philosophy – of a philosophy that requires an attitude of mutual respect, listening, and learning.

It entails a new orientation because, in acknowledgment of the cultural situatedness of philosophy, claims must prove themselves interculturally, and culture and cultures must be consciously kept in view as the context of philosophising. It entails a new practice because this consciousness demands a departure from an individual, mono-cultural production of philosophy and seeks instead a dialogical, process-oriented, fundamentally open polyphony of cultures and disciplines.

polylog seeks to realize such practices in an intercultural dialogue among philosophers as well as other interested scholars and members of society – in a philosophical polylogue. The project pursues this aim by providing a virtual platform for the world-wide discussion of topics in intercultural philosophy. Intercultural philosophy is not thereby intended as a new theory, discipline, or school to be established. Rather, the diversity of intentions and approaches should be met with the greatest possible openness as well as academic seriousness – as much as possible in the appropriate form and manner.
Link: Polylog: Forum for Intercultural Philosophy



Multiculturalism and integration: struggling with confusions

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“Multiculturalism and Integration: struggling with confusions” by Tariq Modood

Abstract:
This spring 2011 has been quite hot politically. The Arab spring has raised new hope about the social and political reform in the Arab countries. It has prompted European societies to rethink their often quoted stereotype that Islam is not compatible with democracy or liberalism. At the same time Prime Minister David Cameron and Chancellor Angela Merkel have announced that multiculturalism has failed. Of course Germany has never practiced any sort of multiculturalism for it to fail (or succeed)! And multiculturalism in Britain seems to be alive and strong even if it has gone through a period of critical rethinking. In this online debate organised by the ACCEPT PLURALISM project, we want to explore some of the limits of the currently used concepts and policy approaches, concentrating in particular on the notion of multiculturalism on one hand, and that of integration, as they are both used with so many different meanings and connotations that they some time risk confusing things. Professor Tariq Modood's paper starts the debate.
Link: “Multiculturalism and Integration: struggling with confusions” by Tariq Modood