Saturday, June 28, 2014

How Race-Studies Scholars Can Respond to Their Haters

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Excerpt:
Graduate school prepares students for a range of intellectual and professional endeavors. Unfortunately, responding to scholarly insults and academic shade-throwing isn’t one of them. But for scholars in the fields of race and ethnic studies—including those who work outside the ivory tower—dealing with snide questions, nasty comments, and occasional name-calling is just part of the job description. Over the years, these academics have repeatedly told me that their work is uniquely misunderstood and dismissed by students, fellow faculty, and the general public. The election of Barack Obama, some say, has only made it tougher to defend ethnic studies: Amid declarations of a “post-racial” America, how do you explain why you study and write about racism?
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U.S. Hispanic and Asian populations growing, but for different reasons (Pew Research Center)

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Excerpts:
U.S. births have been the primary driving force behind the increase in the Hispanic population since 2000 and that trend continued between 2012 and 2013. The Census Bureau estimates that natural increase (births minus deaths) accounted for 78% of the total change in the U.S. Hispanic population from 2012 to 2013.

By comparison, growth in the Asian American population has been fueled primarily by immigration. Fully 74% of Asian adults in 2012 were foreign born according to Pew Research Center analysis of Census data, and international migration accounted for about 61% of the total change in the Asian American population from 2012 to 2013. (Asian American figures represent the population who reported their race alone or in combination with one or more races, and includes Hispanics. Hispanics are of any race.)

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

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The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before (NPR All Things Considered, 24 June 2014)

Excerpt:
Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived. Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

Asian Americans Growing Faster Than Any Other Group in the U.S.

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Excerpt:
ince 2010, Asian Americans have been the fastest-growing racial/ethnic group in the United States. New Census Bureau data confirms that trend continues, with the total Asian-American population in the U.S. at 19.4 million, reflecting a growth rate of 2.9% between 2012 and 2013. That's faster than Hispanics (2.1%), African Americans (1.2%) and Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (2.3%). That 2.9% growth represents about 554,000 people, and according to the report, the primary driver of that population growth was immigration, "accounting for 61 percent of the total Asian population change in the last year."


Saturday, June 21, 2014

Trends indicate Asian Americans should be turning Republican – but they’re not

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Excerpts:
Rising income among other factors indicate that Asian Americans should be a natural fit for the Republican Party, yet they have flocked to the other side at a stunning pace. In the 2012 presidential election, Democratic President Obama garnered 73 percent of the Asian American vote, and Asian Americans have been steadily moving to the Democratic Party over the last two decades, say three academics who are studying the issue.

“It’s puzzling because in political science, it is well-documented that income is positively correlated with the Republican Party,” said Cecilia Mo, assistant professor of political science at Vanderbilt University and one of three authors of the paper, “Why do Asian Americans Identify as Democrats? Testing Theories of Social Exclusion and Intergroup Solidarity.”

“Yet here is this group (Asian Americans) going against this trend that we’ve noticed for decades. Moreover, wealthy Asian Americans are even more likely to vote for Democrats than poorer Asian Americans.”